Connectivism, Social Knowledge, and Participatory Learning

17 10 2010

Around 20 years ago, the definition of the socialization was going outside, meeting new people and being social with them face-to-face. Today, being social has additional defining factors and environments. One of the example of this environments is Facebook.

There are millions of people are using Facebook. They spend hours in a day to post messages, to share pictures and to see what other people are doing. But the question is, why? How can we define these people’s characteristics? Why are they using Facebook? What are the benefits of using Facebook? What is being social?

All these questions are answered with a new learning theory: Connectivism. It is a new theory for defining these people’s behaviors and learning. In social networks, like Facebook, people learn from each other with recognizing and interpreting other people’s ideas. In these networks, people create their own meanings while in the dialogue with others. They relate their own knowledge with other people’s ideas and form their own knowledge. There is no start and end of the course, there is no class rules and there  is no due date. People learn from each other  and they are eager to learn.

Overall, there is a new form of life. We call it Internet. It is living with us, with our beliefs and with our contribution. Our desire to be social is the vital resource for it, and as a reward it gives us opportunities to learn.  And, connectivism explains how we learn.

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3 responses

4 11 2010
IC Staff

Interesting posting… however, it might have been convenient to elaborate little bit more about what Connectivism is and why it is considered a learning theory. It might have also been helpful to discuss some potential negative aspects of this theory, in other words, to criticize its drawbacks instead of only focusing on its positive aspects. For instance, can people really learn any type of content when using social networks like Facebook? Isn’t too distracting using social networks for learning purposes? Isn’t Facebook just a communication technology? Communication technologies might not be sufficient to promote cooperative and collaborative learning.

4 11 2010
Miguel

Interesting posting… however, it might have been convenient to elaborate little bit more about what Connectivism is and why it is considered a learning theory. It might have also been helpful to discuss some potential negative aspects of this theory, in other words, to criticize its drawbacks instead of only focusing on its positive aspects. For instance, can people really learn any type of content when using social networks like Facebook? Isn’t too distracting using social networks for learning purposes? Isn’t Facebook just a communication technology? Communication technologies might not be sufficient to promote cooperative and collaborative learning.

29 11 2010
edtechweb

Thanks….

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